The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the culture of disability across the lifespan. The impact of disabilities on an individual across the lifespan will be explored, and the unique culture that is created by having a disability will be addressed. The historical basis for the disability movement and special education will be addressed, including legislation and litigation that has had a significant impact on the field. Students also will learn about the characteristics of individuals with diverse abilities as well as current trends in educational services.

Study of the history and current status of the social, emotional, physical, and learning characteristics and problems of persons with an intellectual disability; identification and diagnosis; available services and provisions; and educational programs and lifelong processes of adaptation for these individuals and their families. Same as PSYC 322 and REHB 322. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or SPED 117; or equivalent.
The impact of children with special needs on their families; models for the study of family systems are applied to understanding families of children with special needs; emphasis on planning family-focused interventions and exploring strategies for working with parents in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: Practicum experience or consent of instructor.
Overview of special education at the graduate level. Focus is placed on issues related to: assessment, identification, and characteristics across all disability areas. The greatest emphasis is placed on strategies for including students with disabilities in the general curriculum. Historical and legal perspectives that provide the foundation for special education are discussed.
This course provides an overview of special education at the graduate level. The focus is placed on issues related to: assessment, identification, and characteristics across all disability areas. The greatest emphasis is placed on strategies for including students with disabilities in the general curriculum. Historical and legal perspectives that provide the foundation for special education are discussed.